American Friends Service Committee v Irene Chauke SC 1/2012

“There can be no doubt that the Labour Court fell into error in coming to this conclusion as it is settled law that damages in these circumstances must be properly proved by the party seeking the same”.

Introduction

In the Contemporary Employment Law in Zimbabwe, First Edition we indicated that the widely accepted test for determining if an employment relationship exists between the parties is the dominant impression test. This test looks at all the facts of the interaction between the parties to determine if indeed there was an employment relationship. Aspects such as the control of the employee by the employer, supervision, and control must be fully considered. The test also looks at whether the employee was part of an organization. In such a test, therefore, there is no single decisive factor that the court considers. The totality of the evidence presented by the parties is fully considered.

American Friends Service Committee v Irene Chauke SC 1/2012 deals with two important aspects of Zimbabwe’s employment law. First, it outlines the law that applies in a determination as to whether an employment relationship exists between the parties. Secondly, it also assesses and makes a decisive conclusion on the importance of evidence when it comes to the quantification of damages in lieu of reinstatement. These issues are discussed here.

  1. Facts

The issue presented before the Supreme Court centred on whether or not a valid employer-employee relationship existed between the parties. The appellant had initially hired the respondent on fixed-term contracts up until September 2007. However, it was undisputed that the respondent continued to provide services to the appellant beyond this time frame. Her employment was extended on multiple occasions until its termination in June 2009. At the point of termination, she was earning a monthly salary of US$1,500 and was required to work five days per week and eight hours per day. Additionally, her role as office coordinator and programmer required her to report her activities to the regional office located in South Africa. The case at hand thus required a thorough examination of the employment relationship between the parties involved and to ascertain whether an employer-employee relationship existed between the parties.

  1. The court’s findings and the law

The court found that on the facts, the respondent was an employee of the appellant. The fact that the respondent was earning a monthly salary of US$1,500 and was required to work five days per week and eight hours per day all pointed to the existence of an employment relationship.

In addition to the above, the court also found that the arbitrator based his decision regarding the quantification of damages solely on an unsupported statement from the respondent. The Labour Court had accepted this claim without opposition from the appellant. The Supreme Court emphasized that damages in such cases must be properly substantiated by the party making the damages claim.

Conclusion of the dispute

The court’s view was that there was a need for the quantum of damages to be properly proved. The matter was remitted to the Labour Court for determination of the damages after evidence had been adduced.

Own comment

This case highlights the dominant impression test of determining whether an employment relationship exists between the parties. The fact that the Respondent was employed on a fixed-term basis. That he was paid a salary of USD 1500 and reported to superiors in South Africa all pointed to the existence of an employment relationship contemplated by the Labour Act. Every court faced with a dispute regarding the existence of an employment relationship is compelled to look at the totality of the evidence presented by the parties. This resonates well with what the Supreme Court indicated in Masango & Others v Kenneth & Another SC 41–2015 where the court ruled that:

 “…. what the parties call each other in such a contractual relationship, or what they perceive their relationship to be is not decisive and may actually be irrelevant. The court looks at the totality of the evidence and all the circumstances to determine the true nature of the relationship.”

Equally so, the acceptance of damages by a court in the absence of evidence is not ideal. Several court judgements have emphasized the importance of leading evidence in order to support quantification proceedings. In Heywood Investments (Private) Limited T/A GDC Hauliers v Pharaoh Zakeyo SC32/2013 the Supreme Court ruled that:

“What the court is not empowered to do is to award damages in the absence of any evidence in support of such award”

We submit therefore that American Friends Service Committee v Irene Chauke SC 1/2012 is an important case for those who wish to contest the presence or the absence of an employment relationship. It is also a useful case for those seeking to thwart damages that were awarded in the absence of evidence.

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